2016 Cantina Terlan "Porphyr" Lagrein Riserva

SKU #1422966 96 points James Suckling

 You rarely, if ever, see this level of complexity in a Lagrein, which goes headlong through bracken, tea leaves, vanilla, blackberries, undergrowth, heather and violet extract. Full-bodied and very structured indeed, the chewy tannins envelop layers of compact yet exuberant dark fruit. Elements of undergrowth and spice linger on the long finish. Stunning. Delicious now, but better in 2022.  (4/2019)

93 points Robert Parker's Wine Advocate

 The 2016 Alto Adige Lagrein Riserva Porphyr pours from the bottle with deep and dark intensity. Raw cherry and blackberry notes pop out from the big, ripe and dark fruit. There's good dimension to this Lagrein, with lots of inky black fruit and nuance. It's a bit raw. I'm being generous with my drinking window here, and it's probably better to just enjoy this now with a pot roast. The wine ages in barrique for 18 months, with one-third new oak. Some 22,000 bottles were produced. (ML)  (7/2019)


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Price: $64.99

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By: John Downing | K&L Staff Member | Review Date: 9/9/2019 | Send Email
Cantina Terlano's "Porphyr" is one of the finest examples of Lagrein produced. Its name refers to the local alpine bedrock the vineyards reside upon and the grapes for this wine are carefully selected from three sites with vines nearly one hundred years in age. It's a deeply colored red with aromas of smoky black fruits, violets, earth and dark chocolate. Rich, luxurious black fruit melds with rustic tannins and fresh acidity and forms a long-lasting impression.

By: Keith Mabry | K&L Staff Member | Review Date: 7/23/2019 | Send Email
Not a grape varietal that gets much due, but Lagrein can be quite enticing when done well. And let's just agree that Terlan does it well. The Riserva is a wine to behold though, in it's full glory, it is redolent of black cherry and boysenberry flavors with aromas of grilled meats and smoky spices. It is a saturated wine that might make you shake your head and little to remind you that yes, you are in fact in Italy. But that's when the structure and balance of the wine come forth. Acid is there, tannin is there, both giving the supporting framework to keep this beast at bay. It's time to give this wine it's due for certain.

By: Mike Parres | K&L Staff Member | Review Date: 7/23/2019 | Send Email
This Lagrein is made in the Alto Adige. This wine has an elegant perfume, subtle even, with fruit, vanilla and violet notes. On the palate it is a touch austere and quite full bodied, just the thing to match the rustic, rich foods of the mountainous region like lamb with rosemary and hard cheeses.

By: Cameron Hoppas | K&L Staff Member | Review Date: 7/23/2019 | Send Email
Absolutely delicious! I love Lagrein. Blackberry and dried blueberry fruit marry well with smoky, meaty aromas that always tease northern Rhone to me. However, Lagrein is wholly its own animal (pun intended). It can make really nice fresh styles of table wines, or it can be Porphyr: A powerful, elegant, complex wine. It has firm grippy tannins, soft ripe fruits, dark spice, a dense core to a round and full body. This is a complete wine that's only missing one thing: a rich meal centered around a slow cooked meat dish.

By: Greg St. Clair | K&L Staff Member | Review Date: 7/23/2019 | Send Email
Many of you might not be familiar with Lagrein as a varietal, and I always get asked: is it more like Cabernet or Pinot Noir? Well it’s really more like Lagrein, it has its own identity. More often than not, I find Syrah-like characteristics, yet not enough to say this is like Syrah. The wine’s aromatics are a smoldering mix of smoke, meat, brandied cherries, tobacco and … well you get the picture--it's not like anything else. Cantina Terlan’s Porphyr is one of the region’s best illustrations of this varietal, and in this vintage perhaps one of its best examples. On the palate the wine is soft, supple, seductive, filled with complex, fruit, earth, spice, and truthfully a category I label as “exotic aromatics” because I’m not really sure what they are, but they are captivating. I remember having a previous vintage of this wine with gnocchi with a wild boar ragu--simply a thrilling match, but every time I’m in the Alto Adige I surrender to goulash, that paprika kick just bonds with Lagrein in a way that takes my breath away every time. If you like wine you owe it to yourself to try this; it is an experience you won’t regret.

Additional Information:

Varietal:

Lagrein

- This lesser known red varietal grown in Italy's Trentino-Alto-Adige is said to be a cousin of Syrah. It's made into intensely deep red wines that are at once broad and elegant, and most often labeled Lagrein Dunkel or Lagrein Scuro. It's also occasionally made into a rosé -Lagrein Rosato - but these are rarely imported into the United States. Characterized by dark fruit, chocolaty undertones, fresh herbs and good acidity that complements the varietals more rustic tannins.
Country:

Italy

- Once named Enotria for its abundant vineyards, Italy (thanks to the ancient Greeks and Romans) has had an enormous impact on the wine world. From the shores of Italy, the Romans brought grapes and their winemaking techniques to North Africa, Spain and Portugal, Germany, France, the Danube Valley, the Middle East and even England. Modern Italy, which didn't actually exist as a country until the 1870s, once produced mainly simple, everyday wine. It wasn't until the 1970s that Italy began the change toward quality. The 1980s showed incredible efforts and a lot of experimentation. The 1990s marked the real jump in consistent quality, including excellence in many Region that had been indistinct for ages. The entire Italian peninsula is seeing a winemaking revolution and is now one of the most exciting wine Region in the world.
Sub-Region:

Trentino-Alto Adige

Alcohol Content (%): 14